Review of Arrtx Oil Pastels

by | Jan 5, 2023 | Blog | 4 comments

There are different brands of oil pastels, and each one has a different quality of creaminess or tackiness. Since I like to build up layers, I avoid using Neopastels, which are as gooey as lipsticks, and don’t tack up quick enough to allow multiple layers. My favorite brand in the past was Guitar Oil Pastels, but that company went out of business years ago. The closest substitute I had found (until trying these by Arrtx) was Holbein. Holbein makes a wide range of high quality colors but is very pricey.

However there is a new kid on the block called Arrtx. This company sent me the box of oil pastels pictured here for free, in exchange for a review. After trying out their oil pastels with several techniques and applications and comparing them by quality and price to other brands, I’ve put this brand at the top of my favorites list. I tried their 72 Oil Pastel Set. I love sets because it makes it easy to store, is portable in the lightweight box, and fun to have a range of colors at your fingertips.

Pictured above is the Arrtx 72 Oil Pastel Set. The range of colors is wonderful. Lots of subtle neutrals along with a good range of brights. These pastels are not too gooey and not too tacky – just the perfect balance to pile one color on top of another. Scraping back to reveal underlying layers of color was also easy to do. And you can’t beat the price. At the time of writing this, both Arrtx and Holbein oil pastels had these on sale, so I could do a good price comparison. Turns out you can get five Arrtx oil pastels for the price of one Holbein oil pastel!

Here’s a link to purchase the Arrtx Oil Pastels.

Other links to purchase this set:
Amazon US: https://amzn.to/3fsjduP
Amazon CA: https://amzn.to/3RZeCyh
Amazon UK: https://amzn.to/3rM86jh
Amazon DE: https://amzn.to/3CRbZZo
AliExpress: https://bit.ly/3RWNiAT

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4 Comments

  1. space bar clicker

    When do oil pastels expire? Unsure about their condition, I came upon a set of guitars for sale that had not been played.

    Reply
    • Nancy Reyner

      I don’t think they ever expire if stored properly. When exposed to intense heat, like in the trunk of a car for several days traveling around Phoenix, the oil pastels will seep oil and get very dry and powdery. When this happens you can’t use them as they will just crumble. I use Guitar Oil Pastels having purchased them many decades ago and they are still good. This is my favorite brand but didn’t mention it in the article because they are a discontinued brand. If you find them somewhere definitely get them as they are wonderful.

  2. Barb

    Do oil pastels go bad? I found a set of Guitar for sale unused but wasn’t sure if they would still be good.

    Reply
    • Nancy Reyner

      Hi Barb,

      Oil pastels shouldn’t go bad unless they receive extreme heat or are left out in the air too long. It’s best to keep them in a case, container or baggy.
      I have oil pastels from 40 years ago and they are still good.

      Once I took them on a road trip to Phoenix, and left them in a hot car for a couple of days. Most of the pastels “sweated” so the oils seeped out and left them dry like powder. So these were unusable. After that I travel with them in a cooler if they will be in a hot environment for any length of time.

      Another issue is if they are very cold when you try to use them. They get stiff and don’t apply well. Once I needed to use them before my heater went on, so I hovered a blow dryer over them to warm them up a bit. They can be cold for long periods of time without any adverse effects like heat. But they don’t work well when they are cold.

      If you aren’t sure if they are still good, just try them out. If they are still good they will work like normal. If not, they will be too dry.

      Nancy

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Professional fine artist Nancy Reyner’s blog about art, painting and creativity. Her career spans over 30 years. She lives in Santa Fe in the US. Subscribe below for free tips on art and painting.

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